Student Loans and Mortgages: A Financial Balancing Act

You’ve done your time in academia and have come out of college or grad school with a solid job, a good-looking spouse, and, if you’re like most college graduates these days, a fair amount of student debt. After renting for most of your adult life, you might feel ready to purchase your own home and have a space that is truly yours.

It’s certainly possible to qualify for a mortgage while you’re paying student loans, and in many cases it’s even financially advantageous. But before you stay up all night trolling online sites to find your dream home, there are a few factors you should consider to make sure you’re ready to handle both your student loan payments and a new mortgage. Prepare your finances first — then start packing.

Determine When and Where to Buy

Buying a house is a huge investment of both time and money. Before you dive into your search headfirst, take time to reflect on your short-term and long-term goals. Start by asking yourself a few questions:

  • Do you expect to stay at your job, or in your city for the next few years?
  • Do you plan on expanding your family?
  • Is the rent in your city exceptionally high?

Figure out how long you expect to stay in a new home, and whether renting or buying is the better value in your city. Once you decide that buying is the right choice for you, you can then determine how your student loans might affect your ability to qualify for a mortgage.

Make Sure You Can Afford Your Monthly Payments

It’s no secret that finances are an important factor when deciding on your price point. You might be able to handle your monthly principal mortgage payment, but there are many other fees to consider. Here are the most common ones:

  • Interest
  • County or city real estate taxes
  • Homeowners insurance
  • Mortgage insurance (if you have less than a 20% down payment)

These annual fees are broken down and incorporated into your mortgage payment each month. You also need to factor in the cost of home repairs. For relatively new houses, be prepared to set aside at least 1% of the home’s value each year for upkeep. All of these extra expenses might start to feel like a burden if you’re already paying off a sizable student loan balance.

Look at your Finances from a Lender’s Point of View

One of the biggest ways your student loans can affect your ability to qualify for a mortgage is through your debt-to-income ratio, or DTI. This number helps both you and your lender determine what mortgage amount you can realistically afford to repay. For most loan programs, you’ll need a DTI of 41% or lower. Here’s how to calculate yours:

Start by adding up all of your recurring monthly debts, like your credit card minimums, car loans and student loans. Don’t include bills like your cell phone, car insurance or utilities. Then divide that number by how much money you make each month (before taxes are taken out). Multiply your answer by 100 and you’re left with your DTI percentage. Let’s take a look at an example.

Claudia earns $4,000 each month before taxes and health insurance are deducted. She doesn’t have credit card debt, but her monthly student loan payment is $500, and her car payment is $400. So in total, her recurring debt payments come to $900.

$900 / $4,000 = 0.225

That means Claudia’s debt to income ratio is 22.5% — she’s a great candidate for a mortgage!

Consider the Pros and Cons of Refinancing Your Student Loans

You could always increase your down payment amount to lower your home loan starting balance and the associated DTI, but if you don’t have the cash or simply don’t want to deplete your savings, refinancing your student loans may help you qualify for a mortgage. Start by looking for a lower interest rate from private lenders.

Federal Student Loans

Federal loans are already consolidated, and cannot be refinanced, so you’re unlikely to save any money on interest with regard to them. What you can do, however, is lengthen your loan term on a federal loan. On the plus side, you’ll enjoy lower monthly payments, which can help get your DTI under 41% for buying a house. The downside is that you’ll pay substantially more interest in the long run.

Private Student Loans

Shop around with several different lenders to find the best rates on private loans. As with federal loans, you can extend the payment term to lower your monthly payments, or you can check into alternative lenders who use more diverse underwriting standards compared with traditional financial institutions. Refinancing your student loans is a big decision, so make sure to do your research and review multiple lenders before making a commitment.

Ace the Mortgage Process with these 7 tips

Buying a home is considered one of the most stressful events in the average person’s life, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Read on for simple steps you can take to avoid unnecessary frustration and delays.

Be Responsive

After you complete your loan application and submit your documentation, the loan officer needs time to review what you have submitted and make sure nothing is missing. He or she might have questions about your paperwork.

For example, your application might state that you make $6,000 per month while your year-to-date pay stub doesn’t match up exactly. Your loan officer or loan processor would then call or email you asking about the discrepancy. The lender can work on other parts of your loan application while awaiting your response, but when there is a question about income, the lender can only go so far. The longer you delay your response, the longer it will take the lender to process your application. You might even miss your settlement date!

When asked to clarify something about your application, respond quickly and clearly. If you have documentation to support your claim, always send it to your loan officer.

Review Your Credit In Advance

It’s easier than ever these days to get a free copy of your credit report. You really should review it annually, looking for any errors. Many credit card companies today offer a free credit score service, and the three main credit repositories: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion have also created a portal at annualcreditreport.com, where you can view and print your credit report for free.

When reviewing these reports, don’t focus exclusively on the score as it won’t be the very same one the mortgage company receives (but it should be close). What you’re looking for are mistakes because unfortunately, credit reports can often contain errors. Someone else’s bad credit might pop up on your report, or a creditor could mistakenly report a late payment. Don’t be caught off guard when your loan officer calls and tells you something on your credit report is causing problems – be proactive to preserve your credit profile.

Gather Your Financials

When you submit a completed loan application, you’ll also be asked to provide some documentation that will verify certain aspects of your loan. Prepare these in advance so you won’t have to worry about scrambling for paperwork while the clock is ticking on a 30-day closing. Gather your:

  • Most recent pay stubs covering the last 30 days
  • Two most recent W2 forms from your employer(s)
  • Most recent bank statements (all pages) covering the past 60 days
  • Homeowners insurance information
  • Two most recent annual federal income tax returns
  • A year-to-date profit and loss statement as well as business bank statements if self-employed

Note: When using a digital mortgage platform, you’ll still need information contained on these documents – or should review them to eliminate any surprises.

Lookout For New Info

Just before your settlement date and the signing of your loan papers, the lender will make a final pass over your application to be sure the documentation in the file is current.  This includes a review of recent pay stubs, retirement account documents, bank statements and other items. At this time, if there is a more recent document available, the lender will ask for it – and it will feel like a bit of an emergency.

To avoid this issue, always provide updated documents to your lender right when you receive them. You should also save a copy of all messages sent – so you can easily resend if needed.

Don’t Make Changes

This is one of the most common requests/gripes from loan officers when accepting a loan application because the consequences can be catastrophic.

Here are the “Don’ts” to follow when your loan is in process:

  • Don’t take out another credit account.
  • Don’t get a new phone
  • Don’t miss a payment on anything
  • Don’t ask a credit card company for a credit line increase
  • Don’t accept a new credit card offer
  • Don’t co-sign on a loan
  • Don’t buy or lease a car
  • Don’t change jobs
  • Don’t deposit cash into your savings or checking account
  • Don’t withdraw cash from your savings or checking account
  • Don’t change at all from what appears on your mortgage loan application.

Here is the list of “To Do” to follow when your loan is in process:

  • Follow the list above

Ask Questions

One of the main responsibilities of your loan officer is to ensure you have a clear understanding of the process, especially as it relates to closing costs and your interest rate. When you receive your initial offers or cost estimate, review the prospective charges with your loan officer line item by line item and get a clear picture of not just the charge, but why it’s being ordered.

For example, all transactions require a certified Flood Certificate stating whether or not the property is located in a flood zone. Even if your property is nowhere near water or flooding, you’ll still need this in your file. It’s best to ask questions long before you get to the closing table.

Follow Your Lender’s Lead

If you could to look inside your mortgage company while your loan application is being documented and verified, it would probably look like people were spinning plates.

Mortgage lenders must document every aspect of your application and work with multiple other professionals to complete the documentation process in order to get your loan to the underwriting department, which then approves loan. We touched on this earlier, but it can’t be stressed enough: follow the advice of your loan officer, and work with your loan processor to provide requested information as soon as possible.

Mortgage companies do one thing and one thing only: they process mortgage loans. They know exactly what documentation is required and when, so follow the mortgage company’s lead.

If you follow these simple steps, you will be your loan officer’s favorite borrower but more importantly, your loan approval will be easy and stress-free. It all boils down to communication. Talk, ask questions and work hand-in-hand and with your mortgage company to ensure a smooth and simple transition into home ownership.

Mortgage Closing Costs: 3 keys to successful shopping

Getting a mortgage is a complex transaction. Behind the scenes, the process of completing a mortgage requires services from a range of different providers.  Mortgage lending guidelines state that any company providing a service on your loan (and charging for it) must be accounted for and documented within your loan file.

Where can you find your closing costs?

Your mortgage company will typically collect the necessary documents pertaining to these charges and deliver a Loan Estimate.  By law, a Loan Estimate is provided to you within three days of your loan application.  This will be your first opportunity to see a detailed breakdown of the closing costs you can expect for your purchase or refinance. While some charges shown can change by up to 10 percent or more, other charges must be exact and cannot change between the time you make your application and your closing date.

When you first view the Loan Estimate, it may seem a bit confusing as you’ll find charges from numerous third parties – and you may not recognize the names or services they offer.

Fortunately, taking a short amount of time to understand the different categories of closing costs, fees and points will vastly improve your chances of getting a great deal because you will be an informed consumer. So read on!

1. Recurring vs. Non-Recurring Costs

When it comes to the costs of your mortgage loan, certain costs will occur again (recurring), while others are associated with the transaction only and are simply one-time charges (non-recurring).

Why is this important? It is important to differentiate these costs, as recurring costs will typically be associated with owning the actual property (regardless of which mortgage company closes your loan) and should be factored into your ongoing budget. Non-recurring costs are associated purely with the transaction and will not come up again.

Recurring Costs

Recurring costs include prepaid interest charges which are, in reality, your very first mortgage payment! (Wasn’t that exciting!) Normally, mortgage payments are made in arrears, which means that on the first day of every month, you are paying for the previous month’s interest accumulation and a bit of the principal balance.

When it comes time for your closing, you’ll see an amount listed as prepaid interest.  Prepaid interest is a “per diem” (per day) charge of interest between the day your loan closes up to the first day of the following month. This is the one and only time you will pay for interest ahead of time when it comes to your mortgage loan.

Example: Suppose your settlement date is on the 20th of a given month. Your settlement agent will collect ten days of interest (assuming 30 days in the month) at the time of closing. Again, this is your very first mortgage payment, and it is collected in advance just this one time.

Another form of recurring costs involves your property taxes and homeowners insurance. A full year of homeowners insurance premium is typically collected and paid to your insurance company at the time of closing.  Also, you’ll need to pay some amount of property taxes that may be due in the coming year. Property tax collection times and frequency will vary by state or county and include funds paid to the local school district, county and city.

Property taxes and homeowners insurance are recurring costs because you must continue to pay them as long as you are in your home – even if you pay off your mortgage balance completely!

If you decide (or are required to) escrow for these two items, your first regularly scheduled mortgage payment after closing (and all others) will include one-twelfth (1/12th) of your yearly tax and homeowners insurance amount.  These incremental payments will be accumulated by the mortgage company and paid when due.  If you receive a tax bill or insurance bill when you are escrowing these items it is always a good idea to forward to your mortgage company immediately.

Non-Recurring Costs

Non-Recurring costs are those costs associated with the closing of your mortgage loan which will not occur again.  Typically, these are referred to as transaction costs. Examples include a lender/broker fee (could be called “Origination Fee”), an appraisal fee, and document preparation fees.

In some states, you may also be required to pay a state-mandated transaction fee at closing. In the state of Pennsylvania, for example, a two percent (2%) transfer tax is charged by the State for each home purchase. This amount is typically split between the buyer and seller and is not a lender charge.

2. Lender Fees vs. Non-Lender Fees

When it comes to shopping for the best mortgage deal between lenders, you’ll want to pay attention to fees payable to the lender versus fees payable to third parties. Why? Lender fees and interest rates are the true “apples to apples” numbers you can compare when shopping for your mortgage provider. Accordingly, lender fees should be considered separately from third party fees which are payable to different companies and cannot be “padded” by the lender.

Note: You can always shop for third party services such as appraisal services, title companies and home inspectors, after you select a mortgage lender. 

Lender Fees

A lender or broker fee will appear in black and white when you are comparing offers or when you are viewing a Loan Estimate. This may also appear as a percentage of your loan amount.  In either case, this amount will be paid directly to the lender or broker in exchange for providing their services.

When two separate lenders provide the same interest rate, the offer that includes lower lender fees is the lower cost option of the two. 

Providing an interest rate above a “par rate” to earn yield spread (YSP) is another way money is generated for mortgage lenders or brokers.  Similar to a retail store owner sourcing and purchasing clothing at wholesale prices and then selling at a retail markup price, the mortgage lender or broker sources your loan on the wholesale market and charges a retail markup interest rate.

Non-lender Fees

Non-lender fees include charges for services such as title insurance, an appraisal or abstract. On your Loan Estimate, as well as on your Closing Disclosure, the lender charges will be located at the top of the document and all non-lender fees will be detailed below. Remember that you can shop for these third party services – just as you would a mortgage lender.

3. What are Points?

A point (discount point) is a percentage of the loan amount you can pay upfront to reduce, or discount, the interest rate on your loan.

Example: A loan officer might quote to you a 30-year fixed rate at 4.75% with no points, but if you want to get a lower rate, say 4.50%, you’ll be asked to pay one point, or one percent of the amount to be borrowed, at closing.

Points are a form of prepaid interest to the lender, and different from an origination fee or other fee, the lender is indifferent if you select to pay them. This is because the lender earns the same amount of interest either way. Either you pay a slightly higher interest rate over time, or you pay the interest upfront via a discount point and pay less interest over the life of the loan.

Lenders can provide an array of interest rate options based upon the number of points purchased. They can offer a particular interest rate for 0 points, another interest rate for 1 point, and so on. To determine whether or not paying points makes sense in your situation, it is a good idea to compare the total funds required at closing and the difference in monthly payments at various rate and point combinations. You may also want to think about how long you intend to be in the home and if paying interest ahead of schedule makes good financial sense.

Tip: Your lender can usually offer a lender credit toward closing costs if you elect to pay a higher interest rate over time. The higher rate generates extra revenue for the lender and they use these funds to pay some or all of your fees. When you hear about lenders advertising a “no closing cost loan,” this is how they do it.

Now that you know a bit more about the types of mortgage closing costs – be sure to compare them along with the interest rate when mortgage shopping. Your choice of a mortgage lender and loan program will have a lasting impact on your budget – so shop for a great loan and set yourself up for financial success by getting the best deal possible.

Tip: Compare mortgage lenders safely and easily at MortgageCS.com.  Once your account is set up – you can anonymously obtain detailed quotes for your exact situation.

VA and USDA Loans: 0% Down Loans For Those Who Qualify

FHA loans may be the most common government-backed loan when it comes to buying a home, but there are two others that may provide an even better fit for the right candidates: VA Loans, and USDA Loans.

VA Loans

The VA loan was created in 1944 to guarantee loans issued to veterans and their families. Many military families find it difficult to qualify for conventional loans due to tough credit standards and down payment requirements, but with a VA loan, home ownership is within their reach.

Here are some points about VA loans that may be of interest to you:

  • There is no down payment required, however, there is a funding fee of 2.15% of the purchase price (3.3% if you’ve used a VA loan before)
  • There is no private mortgage insurance (PMI) required
  • Interest rates can be better than conventional loans by up to 1 percent
  • Qualifying for a loan is easier
  • Your Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) is counted as income
  • Closing costs can be lower

With such wonderful benefits, why isn’t everyone going for this loan? Not everyone qualifies. Let’s take a look at qualifications for the loan.

The VA Loan is designed for those who have served our country in the military.

To be considered, you must:

  • Have served 90 consecutive days of active service during wartime, OR
  • Have served 181 days of active service during peacetime, OR
  • Have more than 6 years of service in the National Guard or Reserves, OR
  • Be the spouse of a service member who has died either in the line of duty or as a result of a service-related disability

If you meet the military qualifications, you will also have some income qualifications to meet. Unlike most loans, the VA Loan doesn’t set a specific income level requirement. However, you will need to have stable, reliable income that can cover your monthly expenses including the new mortgage payment.

Instead of front-end and back-end debt to income ratios, VA loan requirements look at residual income. Residual income, also known as discretionary income, is the money that is left over after you have made all your monthly payments, including your mortgage and escrows, student loans, car loans, credit card bills, child support, spousal support, day care, and other obligations. Expenses such as food, entertainment, and utilities are not considered when determining your residual income.

USDA Loans

The USDA’s Rural Housing Service offers a program known as the Section 502 Direct Loan Program. This program provides either a direct loan or a loan guarantee to low and moderate-income borrowers wishing to buy in a rural area.

To qualify for this USDA loan, you must:

  • Have an adjusted income that is at or below the low-income limit for the area in which you are buying a home
  • Currently be without good housing
  • Be unable to get a loan from other sources
  • Plan on living in the home as your primary residence
  • Be a citizen of the United States

In addition to the borrower’s qualifications, the home itself must also qualify. It must:

  • Be less than 1,800 square feet
  • Have a market value that is less than the area’s loan limit
  • Have no swimming pool
  • Not be an income generating property
  • Be in an eligible area, which is a rural area with a population of fewer than 35,000 people

These loans have fixed interest rates based on current market rates. However, since the rates are modified by payment assistance, your rate could be as low as 1%. Additionally, most loans are for 33 years instead of the traditional 30. For those with very low income, this can be stretched to 38 years. Finally, you will not need a down payment unless your assets are higher than the predetermined limits. If they are, you may be required to use some of your assets as a down payment.

Unlike other government-backed programs, the USDA program will require that you repay all or a portion of the payment subsidy when you no longer live in the home.

7 striking similarities between Mortgage & Home Air Conditioner Shopping

If you have ever shopped for a new home air conditioner, you know how time consuming and confusing the process can be. Likewise, if you have recently shopped for a mortgage, you probably spent a good deal of time learning and considering your options.

On the surface, these industries are far and apart. After all, a mortgage is a financial product and air conditioners are physical products used to increase home comfort.  Despite the difference between industries, the sales environment and process of shopping for these two products is strikingly similar.

AC vs. MTG

Here is a toe-to-toe comparison detailing 7 similarities.

Mortgage interest rate shopping?

If you are looking for a new purchase mortgage or refinance mortgage, I suggest using MortgageCS. Getting answers from live verified loan officers and saving up to 90% of the time needed to shop – ALL while protecting your personal information – is a great way to take the sting out of the process.

If you are in the market for a new air conditioner, I have to let you know that we haven’t yet created AirConditionerCS – but we’ll be sure to keep you posted!

On a serious note, we have created a few tips on how to get the best results when mortgage shopping. Check out this recent post.

Purchase Mortgages Part 3: What goes into a mortgage payment?

When it comes to buying a home, it isn’t just the loan amount and interest rate that will impact your monthly payment. Additional items such as property insurance and taxes can increase a required monthly payment by as much as 35%.  If you are planning to put down less than 20%, you’ll also want to factor in paying for mortgage insurance each month.

What goes into a mortgage payment?

The good news is that virtually every mortgage payment is made up of the same key ingredients. They are principal, interest, taxes and insurance. These four items are typically referred to as PITI – which, when spoken, sounds like “pity”.

The bad news is that certain factors of your monthly payment will not be within your control.  Namely, the property taxes and property insurance. These factors can change (likely increase) over time and will usually be paid each month along with the principal and interest on your loan.

When you are shopping for a home, keep your eye on the amount of property tax required each year.  Property tax amounts can vary between properties and across state, town or county lines.

Now that you are armed with a better understanding of PITI, be sure to understand the basics of a mortgage and learn about debt ratios.  Once you have a handle on these three topics, you’ll be well on your way to becoming a savvy mortgage shopper and homeowner.

Looking to get your mortgage shopping started (or double check your rate and program)?  Ask your Realtor for access to MortgageCS so you can shop your mortgage terms without the requirement of giving up your personal contact information (and save 90% of the time it takes to shop elsewhere!).

Related Posts in this Series

Part 1: What is a mortgage?

Part 2: What is a debt ratio?

 

Purchase Mortgages Part 2: How much can I afford?

When a mortgage lender qualifies a borrower, they will examine income and monthly debts to establish a debt ratio. If you are wondering what a debt ratio is, and how it is calculated, take a look at this graphic and read on.

Mortgage Debt Ratios

A debt ratio compares monthly debts to income and then generates a number that is usually converted to a percentage. If your debt ratio is too high, you may not qualify for certain loan programs…or worse, may not qualify for a loan at all!

Lenders will typically run two different debt ratio calculations. The “front-end” ratio will examine all debts except for your housing payment. The “back end” ratio will examine all debts and include a soon-to-be housing payment.

For the purpose of this introduction, the graphic below considers only the “back-end” ratio which includes the soon-to-be mortgage payment in the calculation.

Let’s also take a look at an example. Assume you earn $5,000 each month and have a student loan payment of $400 and a car payment of $250 each month as well.  Your front end ratio will be $650/$5,000 = 13%.  This number is far below the typical requirement of 31% for FHA loan front end ratios.

Now consider adding in your new housing payment (including the mortgage payment, taxes, insurance, and mortgage insurance) of $1,500.  Including this debt will generate a back end ratio of ($650 + $1,500)/$5,000 = 43%, the limit for most FHA back-end ratios.

Tip: Remember to use gross income when it comes to calculating a debt ratio. Gross income is the amount of income BEFORE taxes and other items, such as health insurance or 401k contributions, are taken out. 

In part one of this series, we learned a bit about the relationship between the purchase price, down payment and loan amount of a purchase mortgage. Now that we have a better understanding of debt ratios, we will take a look at what actually makes up a mortgage payment – and it may be more than you think!

Related Posts in this Series

Part 1: What is a mortgage? 

Part 3: What makes up a mortgage payment?

Purchase Mortgages Part 1: What is a mortgage?

If you are looking to purchase a home this spring or summer, you may be searching for an easy way to learn about your mortgage options. Or, you may be wondering what a mortgage is and know nothing about them at all!

Regardless of your current knowledge base, a quick primer on purchase mortgages can save time, money and quite a bit of frustration!  

In this series of posts, we’ll cover three concepts using real numbers and supporting images. The goal is to give you a clear understanding of purchase mortgage basics – so you can easily apply new learnings as you continue your journey! Now, let’s get started!

What is a mortgage?

When it comes to purchasing a home, you’ll need to pay the current property owner for the home and cover the related costs associated with the sale transaction. Understanding how the closing costs, down payment and loan amount are related to the home sale price is an important first step in understanding purchase mortgage options. 

If you are looking for a more technical definition, please read on.

A mortgage is legal document that creates a lien on a property after an agreement is reached between a lender and a borrower. The mortgage is recorded as a public record document at the local county’s office and secures the subject property as the collateral in consideration for a loan. 

Now that we know a bit more about the cash needed to buy a home and how those funds will be allocated, it is time to examine home affordability by taking a look at something called a debt ratio.

Next Up

Part 2: How much can I afford? 

Part 3: What makes up a mortgage payment? 

Prequalification letters: How they help you, your Realtor and the seller

If you are searching for a home this spring, you’ll need a prequalification letter to prove you have your finances in order. Without one, your offer to buy a home is likely to fall flat, very flat.

So, what is a prequalification letter (aka “prequal”) and why is it so important? Let’s take a look at three different perspectives to understand how this one document can play such an important role in kicking off a real estate transaction.

Prequalification letters guide the mortgage borrower

The term “mortgage borrower” refers to you. When you purchase a home, you will likely require a mortgage and therefore, you will become the mortgage borrower. So how much can you actually borrow?

While we could break out the calculators and scratch paper (or Excel), there is no need to because the lender handles it all. Said another way, the lender that prequalifies you will ask a series of questions and obtain your credit report. This process allows the lender to create a prequalification letter that includes, among other things, your maximum loan size.

Note: While the maximum loan size is great to know, please do not confuse it with being anything other than just that – a maximum. Be sure to budget your own finances to ensure you can comfortably manage your new monthly mortgage payment.

In summary, a prequalification letter for a mortgage borrower provides the confidence to know (preliminarily) that they can qualify for the mortgage amount needed to purchase a particular home.

Realtors identify serious shoppers

Having a prequalification letter in hand when first connecting with a Realtor indicates you have done your homework and are a serious shopper. Without a prequal letter, there is virtually no way for a Realtor to confirm (or deny) your ability to purchase a home.

This is important because a Realtor has just 24 hours in a day and 7 days in a week (just like you and me). Despite the fact that the best Realtors make us feel like we are their only clients, they are often juggling multiple transactions simultaneously.

Realtors need to be selective with their time. Home shoppers that show up with a prequal in-hand will always get more attention than those that show up empty-handed.

Sellers look for prequalification letters

We are currently in a seller’s market, where high competition exists for a limited supply of homes. Based on this, home sellers will likely receive multiple offers from a range of prospective buyers.

When a seller receives multiple offers simultaneously, one would think that the highest priced offer always wins. While that may typically be the case, other factors, such as down payment amount, loan program selection and other contingencies are also compared to determine the likelihood of a smooth transaction.

Tip: Contingencies are conditions that must be met prior to the sale of a property.  While many contingencies are negotiable, standard ones include a buyer’s home inspection and the buyer successfully obtaining a loan or financing to purchase the property.  

When a seller is evaluating a range of offers, any offer lacking a prequalification letter will be devalued regardless of the purchase price offered. As a matter of fact, it is virtually a requirement these days that an offer to purchase a property include a prequalification letter.

Related posts:

Wondering if all Lenders offer the same interest rate? Look here.

Concerned about increasing interest rates? Look here.

3 must do’s after a weekend of house hunting

It’s Monday…and you’ve just had an exhilarating weekend of house hunting. You’ve seen the good, the bad, and just about everything else while driving all around town. Some of the properties you just walked through may already be under contract – so you can cross them off your list!

A weekend of house hunting can be quite discouraging in a seller’s market. So how can you keep your head up when you feel like you are fighting a losing battle? Do these three things each Monday – and you’ll be ready to act when the time is right.

Catalogue the properties you viewed

Document the property address, style of home, list price, best attributes & other important details. Ask yourself this question: What kept you from being interested in the property or what made you want it?

By doing this, you’ll find that certain property features will come to the surface as most important. This will help guide your future searching and make you more confident (so you can act more quickly next time).

Check in with your Realtor

Contact your trusted Realtor to talk through the properties that were most attractive to you.  After learning of a small price change or other information, a “maybe” on your list could turn into a “yes!”

If you do find yourself interested in a property, the time to act is now. You can request a second showing or cut to the chase and get a purchase contract written up! Remember, you aren’t the only one eyeing that property in this seller’s market – so act quickly.

Stay current on mortgage rates

Interest rates change at least every day, and can swing drastically over the course of a week. A small change in interest rate can make a BIG difference in monthly payment – so staying up to date on available mortgage rates and programs is a must!

For example, the monthly payment on a $350,000 mortgage will drop by $26 if rates are just 0.125% lower! That’s a savings of $312 a year – or about one free car payment!

Just as it is important to shop lenders early in the process, it is also important to keep your knowledge level up as you hunt for that perfect home. After all, a dip in mortgage rates will make all homes more affordable.

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