A Day in the Life of a Loan Officer (Video)

Video Transcript: Have you ever wondered what your loan officer does all day?

In a nutshell he or she is working hard on your behalf to close your loan while also managing many other tasks. At times it may feel like they’re doing everything but working on your loan, so keep in mind that loan officers typically only make money when they actually close loans. They want your deal to close.

Your loan officer will change hats constantly throughout their day. They’re a consultant in the morning, a documents processor in the afternoon, a marketer in the evening and a problem solver just about all of the time. One of their toughest jobs is overcoming obstacles associated with documentation requirements and other questions brought up by underwriters. They’re running interference for you all day long, and making a complex process feel a lot more simple than it actually is.

A typical path of working with a loan originator looks like this: You’ll be introduced through MortgageCS or some other way, where you have an opportunity to interact and then exchange information when the time is right. Keep in mind that a good loan officer listens carefully, takes time to understand your complete situation and then develops a proposal that meets your short-term and long-term needs.

A good proposal is much more than the lowest rate being offered. It considers interest rate as well as the length of time you plan to stay in the home, the best strategy for the down payment, the amount of the mortgage, and the estimated closing costs.

Loan Originators stay up to date on program guidelines, complete numerous licensing classes and work hard to set proper expectations that result in delighting their clients. At MortgageCS, loan originators know that a happy customer will leave positive feedback and this will help them build their reputation in the platform – which is about the best marketing a loan officer can get.

“My Loan Was Sold!” (Video)

If you know your loan is going to be sold, or if you just found out it was sold, you may be wondering how it could impact your situation.

Watch this short video and find out what you really need to know:

Transcript of Video:

If you know your loan is going to be sold, or if you just found out it was sold, there is no need to panic. Lenders sell all types of loans to other banks on a regular basis. It’s part of their daily business and it’s how they ensure they can continue to make more loans in the future.

In all likelihood, your mortgage will probably change hands several times as banks buy and sell on the secondary market.

So what is this secondary market all about? And how does it impact the terms of your mortgage?

Let’s start with the impact on your loan. There’s no real impact. You have a contract that guarantees the terms of your mortgage, even after it’s sold to another lender. You may have to change the auto-payment settings on your checking account and call a different customer service number, but there won’t be any changes to any of the terms of your agreement.

Now why would a lender sell your loan in the first place? And what’s the secondary market? To answer this question you just need to remember that banks are always working to maximize their profits. And sometimes it’s better for them to sell a loan today, instead of waiting 15 or 30 years to collect small chunks in monthly payments.

Some lenders will sell a mortgage immediately after it closes, often lining up buyers while the loan is still being processed. Other lenders wait until they have a batch of loans. Then they sell them together in a single package, which bankers refer to as a “bulk” sale.

Keep in mind that the secondary mortgage market increases competition, which improves mortgage pricing and terms for you as the borrower. So the fact that your loan can be sold is a very good thing and it shouldn’t be perceived any other way.